Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

NOTE 4: SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

v3.19.2
NOTE 4: SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2019
Notes  
NOTE 4: SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

NOTE 4: SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements as well as the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during reporting periods. Actual results could differ from these estimates. Significant estimates are assumptions about collection of accounts receivable, useful life of intangible assets and assumptions used in Black-Scholes-Merton, or BSM, valuation methods, such as expected volatility, risk-free interest rate and expected dividend rate.

 

Cash equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. As of June 30, 2019, the Company had no cash equivalents.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory consists of finished goods available for sale and raw materials owned by the Company and are stated at the lower of cost or market. As of June 30, 2019 the finished goods inventory totaled $104 and raw materials in production totaled $84,566.

 

Property and equipment

 

Property and equipment are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is computed using straight-line method over the estimated useful life. New assets and expenditures that extend the useful life of property or equipment are capitalized and depreciated. Expenditures for ordinary repairs and maintenance are charged to operations as incurred. For the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 the Company recorded $1,678 of depreciation expense for each of these periods. For the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 the Company recorded $839 of depreciation expenses for each of these periods.

 

Intangible Assets

 

As required by generally accepted accounting principles, trademarks and patents are not amortized since they have an indefinite life. Instead, they are tested annually for impairment. Intangible assets as of June 30, 2019 amounted to $50,534 net of accumulated impairment losses of $664,898.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

On January 1, 2018 the Company adopted guidance contained in Topic 606 (FASB ASC 606). The core principle of Topic 606 (FASB ASC 606) is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods of services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The revenue recognition guidance contained in Topic 606, to follow the five-step revenue recognition model along with other guidance impacted by this standard: (1) identify the contract with the customer; (2) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (3) determine the transportation price; (4) allocate the transportation price; (5) recognize revenue when or as the entity satisfies a performance obligation. Previous practices were broadly consistent with this approach, and the company determined the amount of revenue based on the amount customer paid or promised to pay.

 

Revenues are recognized when title for goods is transferred; non-refundable fees and proceeds from irrevocable agreements recognized when inflows or other enhancements of assets of the Company are received.

 

On August 21, 2018, AXIM Biotechnologies, Inc. (the “Company”) entered into an agreement with Revive Therapeutics Ltd. (“Revive”) to begin selling the Company’s flagship nutraceutical product throughout the rapidly expanding Canadian cannabis market.

 

The agreement defines a relationship where Revive will seek regulatory approval for AXIM’s proprietary, controlled-release functional chewing gum which contains hemp oil and cannabidiol (CBD). Under the terms of the agreement, Revive will have a minimum purchase amount annually, which increases each year for the term of the agreement.

 

On September 3, 2018, the Company entered into a Letter of Intent (“LOI”) with Impression Health Limited (“Impression”), Australian company. Pursuant to the LOI, both parties will endeavor to enter into a definitive agreement whereby the parties will co-develop new products. Impression will collaborate with Axim for the licensing and distribution of its current and future medical cannabinoid products for distribution in Australia and New Zealand.

 

On February 8, 2019 the Company received orders for 7,500 boxes (225,000 individual units, or 22,500 blisters) of its chewing gums. The orders were produced and shipped to the clients as of June 30, 2019.

 

On April 23, 2019, the Company announced that its nutraceutical division entered into a purchase order agreement for the purchase of 50,000 boxes (1.5 million individual pieces) of its proprietary cannabidiol (CBD)-based chewing gum with a leading direct-to-consumer company for distribution throughout the United States.

 

On May 31, 2019, AXIM Biotechnologies, Inc. (“AXIM”) entered into a cannabinoid product supply agreement with Impression Healthcare Limited (“Impression”), Australia’s largest home dental impression company, for the supply of the AXIM’s toothpaste and mouthwash containing cannabidiol (CBD) for its clinical trial for the treatment of periodontitis. The supply agreement is in preparation for a clinical trial to test the effectiveness of CBD in treating periodontitis. The clinical trial will be performed at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. In accordance with the agreement, AXIM will supply the first batch of its patented toothpaste and mouthwash products containing CBD, along with associated placebo units for Impression to perform a randomized control clinical trial.

 

Revenues from continuing operations recognized for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 amounted to $93,088, $8,174, $110,149 and $22,422, respectively. The Company expanded sales activities and received new orders in 2019.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Axim Biotechnologies, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiaries Axim Holdings, Inc. Can Chew License Company, Marina Street LLC and Axim Biotechnologies (the Netherland Company) as of June 30, 2019. All significant intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Derivative Liabilities

 

The Company assessed the classification of its derivative financial instruments as of June 30, 2019, which consist of convertible instruments and rights to shares of the Company’s common stock and determined that such derivatives meet the criteria for liability classification under ASC 815.

 

ASC 815 generally provides three criteria that, if met, require companies to bifurcate conversion options from their host instruments and account for them as free standing derivative financial instruments. These three criteria include circumstances in which (a) the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative instrument are not clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, (b) the hybrid instrument that embodies both the embedded derivative instrument and the host contract is not re-measured at fair value under otherwise applicable generally accepted accounting principles with changes in fair value reported in earnings as they occur and (c) a separate instrument with the same terms as the embedded derivative instrument would be considered a derivative instrument subject to the requirement of ASC 815. ASC 815 also provides an exception to this rule when the host instrument is deemed to be conventional, as described.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company applies the guidance that is codified under ASC 820-10 related to assets and liabilities recognized or disclosed in the financial statements at fair value on a recurring basis. ASC 820-10 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. The provisions of ASC 820-10 only apply to the Company’s investment securities, which are carried at fair value.

 

ASC 820-10 clarifies that fair value is an exit price, representing the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants based on the highest and best use of the asset or liability. As such, fair value is a market-based measurement that is determined based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability. ASC 820-10 requires valuation techniques to measure fair value that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. These inputs are prioritized as follows:

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

Inputs to Fair Value Methodology

Level 1

Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities

Level 2

Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the financial instrument; inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability; or inputs that are derived principally from, or corroborated by, observable market information

Level 3

Pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption is unobservable or when the estimation of fair value requires significant management judgment

 

The Company categorizes a financial instrument in the fair value hierarchy based on the lowest level of input that is significant to its fair value measurement.

 

 

As of June 30, 2019

 

Quoted Market Prices in

Active Markets

(Level 1)

Internal Models with

Significant Observable

Market Parameters

(Level 2)

Internal Models with

Significant Unobservable

Market Parameters

(Level 3)

Total Fair Value

Reported in

Financial Statements

Marketable Securities

$288,400

$  -

$  -

$288,400

 

 

As of December 31, 2018

 

Quoted Market Prices in

Active Markets

(Level 1)

Internal Models with

Significant Observable

Market Parameters

(Level 2)

Internal Models with

Significant Unobservable

Market Parameters

(Level 3)

Total Fair Value

Reported in

Financial Statements

Marketable Securities

$150,000

$  -

$  -

$150,000

 

The Company recorded a change in FMV of trading securities as unrealized gain of $138,400 for the six months ended June 30, 2019. These securities are classified as trading.

 

The Company did not have any Level 2 or Level 3 assets or liabilities as of June 30, 2019, except for its convertible notes payable and derivative liability. The carrying amounts of these liabilities at June 30, 2019 approximate their respective fair value based on the Company’s incremental borrowing rate.

 

Cash is as of June 30, 2019 is classified as Level 1 within our fair value hierarchy.

 

Convertible Instruments

 

The Company evaluates and accounts for conversion options embedded in its convertible instruments in accordance with professional standards for “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities”.

 

Professional standards generally provide three criteria that, if met, require companies to bifurcate conversion options from their host instruments and account for them as free standing derivative financial instruments. These three criteria include circumstances in which (a) the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative instruments are not clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, (b) the hybrid instrument that embodies both the embedded derivative instrument and the host contract is not re-measured at fair value under otherwise applicable generally accepted accounting principles with changes in fair value reported in earnings as they occur and (c) a separate instrument with the same terms as the embedded derivative instrument would be considered a derivative instrument. Professional standards also provide an exception to this rule when the host instrument is deemed to be conventional as defined under professional standards as “The Meaning of “Conventional Convertible Debt Instrument”.

 

The Company accounts for convertible instruments (when it has determined that the embedded conversion options should not be bifurcated from their host instruments) in accordance with professional standards when “Accounting for Convertible Securities with Beneficial Conversion Features,” as those professional standards pertain to “Certain Convertible Instruments.” Accordingly, the Company records, when necessary, discounts to convertible notes for the intrinsic value of conversion options embedded in debt instruments based upon the differences between the fair value of the underlying common stock at the commitment date of the note transaction and the effective conversion price embedded in the note. Debt discounts under these arrangements are amortized over the term of the related debt to their earliest date of redemption. The Company also records when necessary deemed dividends for the intrinsic value of conversion options embedded in preferred shares based upon the differences between the fair value of the underlying common stock at the commitment date of the note transaction and the effective conversion price embedded in the note.

 

ASC 815-40 provides that, among other things, generally, if an event is not within the entity’s control could or require net cash settlement, then the contract shall be classified as an asset or a liability.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company follows Section 740-10, Income tax (“ASC 740-10”) Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, which requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are based on the differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the Statements of Operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company recognizes deferred tax assets to the extent that the Company believes that these assets are more likely than not to be realized. In making such a determination, the Company considers all available positive and negative evidence, including reversals of any existing taxable temporary differences, projected future taxable income, tax planning strategies, and the results of recent operations. If the Company determines that it would be able to realize a deferred tax asset in the future in excess of any recorded amount, the Company would make an adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance, which would reduce the provision for income taxes.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification ("Section 740-10-25"). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures. The Company had no liabilities for unrecognized income tax benefits according to the provisions of Section 740-10-25.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments and related items, which potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk, consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents. The Company places its cash and temporary cash investments with credit quality institutions. At times, such amounts may be in excess of the FDIC insurance limit. The Company does not have allowance for doubtful accounts at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018. The Company had -0- accounts receivable at June 30, 2019 and -0- at December 31, 2018.

 

Net Loss per Common Share

 

Net loss per common share is computed pursuant to section 260-10-45 Earnings Per Share (“ASC 260-10”) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding and the member potentially outstanding during each period. In periods when a net loss is experienced, only basic net loss per share is calculated because to do otherwise would be anti-dilutive.

 

There were 16,047,678 common share equivalents at June 30, 2019 and 15,843,037 common shares at December 31, 2018. For the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 these potential shares were excluded from the shares used to calculate diluted earnings per share as their inclusion would reduce net loss per share.

 

Stock Based Compensation

 

All stock-based payments to employees and to nonemployee directors for their services as directors, including any grants of restricted stock and stock options, are measured at fair value on the grant date and recognized in the statements of operations as compensation or other expense over the relevant service period. Stock-based payments to nonemployees are recognized as an expense over the period of performance. Such payments are measured at fair value at the earlier of the date a performance commitment is reached, or the date performance is completed. In addition, for awards that vest immediately and are non-forfeitable the measurement date is the date the award is issued.

 

Cost of Sales

 

Cost of sales includes the purchase cost of products sold and all costs associated with getting the products to the customers including buying and transportation costs.

 

Research and Development

 

The Company accounts for research and development costs in accordance with the Accounting Standards Codification subtopic 730-10, Research and Development (“ASC 730-10”). Under ASC 730-10, all research and development costs must be charged to expense as incurred. Accordingly, internal research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Third-party research and development costs are expensed when the contracted work has been performed or as milestone results have been achieved. Company-sponsored research and development costs related to both present and future products are expensed in the period incurred. The Company incurred research and development expenses of $991,637 and $672,743 for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 respectively. The Company incurred research and development expenses of $1,524,316 and $1,351,398 for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 respectively.

 

Shipping Costs

 

Shipping and handling costs billed to customers are recorded in sales. Shipping costs incurred by the company are recorded in general and administrative expenses.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

In March 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-01, Leases (Topic 842) Codification Improvements, which provides clarification on implementation issues associated with adopting ASU 2016-02. The implementation issues noted in ASU 2019-01 include determining the fair value of the underlying asset by lessors that are not manufacturers or dealers, presentation on the statement of cash flows for sales-type and direct financing leases, and transition disclosures related to Topic 250, Accounting Changes and Error Corrections. We will apply the guidance, if applicable, as of January 1, 2019, the date we adopted ASU 2016-02. Refer to the discussion of ASU 2016-02 below for the impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof. In February 2016, FASB issued an update 2016-02 and created Topic 842, Leases. Topic 842 effects any entity that enters into a lease arrangement with another person. The guidance in this update supersedes Topic 840. The main difference between previous GAAP and Topic 842 is the recognition of accounting policies for leases classified as operating leases under previous GAAP. The amendments in this update for public business entities that file with the Securities and Exchange Commission are effective for fiscal years beginning after Dec. 15, 2018 and the interim periods within that year with early application permitted for all entities. The Company is adopting the lease accounting model as described in Topic 842 for the fiscal year begins on January 1, 2019.

 

The Company has no long-term operating leases and thus the adoption of ASC 842 had no impact on the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

In November 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-18, Collaborative Arrangements (Topic 818): Clarifying the Interaction Between Topic 808 and Topic 606, which clarifies when transactions between participants in a collaborative arrangement are within the scope of the FASB’s revenue standard, Topic 606. The standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. We will adopt this standard on its effective date of January 1, 2020. We do not expect the adoption of this ASU to have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof.

 

In October 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-17, Targeted Improvements to Related Party Guidance for Variable Interest Entities, that changes the guidance for determining whether a decision-making fee paid to a decision makers and service providers are variable interests. The guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. We will adopt this standard on its effective date of January 1, 2020. We do not expect the adoption of this ASU to have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other-Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract. ASU 2018-15 aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software. The standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. We will adopt this standard on its effective date of January 1, 2020. We are currently evaluating the impact of this ASU on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof.

 

In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement.” This ASU eliminates, adds and modifies certain disclosure requirements for fair value measurements as part of its disclosure framework project. The standard is effective for all entities for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-09, “Codification Improvements.” This ASU makes changes to a variety of topics to clarify, correct errors in, or make minor improvements to the Accounting Standards Codification. The majority of the amendments in ASU 2018-09 will be effective for the Company for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company expects to adopt ASU 2018-09 in the first quarter of 2019. The Company is evaluating the impact of the standard and does not expect the guidance to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, “Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting”, which simplifies the accounting for nonemployee share-based payment transactions. The amendments specify that Topic 718 applies to all share-based payment transactions in which a grantor acquires goods or services to be used or consumed in a grantor’s own operations by issuing share-based payment awards. The standard is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In September 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-13, Revenue Recognition (Topic 605), Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), Leases (Topic 840), and Leases (Topic 842). The effective date for ASU 2017-13 is for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018.

 

In July 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480) and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Part 1 – Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features and Part 2 – Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with Scope Exception (“ASU No. 2017-11”). Part 1 of ASU No. 2017-11 addresses the complexity of accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. Down round features are provisions in certain equity-linked instruments (or embedded features) that result in the strike price being reduced on the basis of the pricing of future equity offerings. Current accounting guidance creates cost and complexity for entities that issue financial instruments (such as warrants and convertible instruments) with down round features that require fair value measurement of the entire instrument or conversion option. Part II of ASU No. 2017-11 addresses the difficulty of navigating Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity, because of the existence of extensive pending content in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification®. This pending content is the result of the indefinite deferral of accounting requirements about mandatorily redeemable financial instruments of certain nonpublic entities and certain mandatorily redeemable noncontrolling interests. For public business entities, the amendments in Part I of this update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018. The amendments in Part II of this update do not require any transition guidance because those amendments do not have an accounting effect. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) that will eliminate the requirement to calculate the implied fair value of goodwill to measure a goodwill impairment charge. Instead, impairment charge will be based on the excess of a reporting unit's carrying amount over its fair value. The guidance is effective for the Company in the first quarter of fiscal 2023. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not anticipate the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements, absent any goodwill impairment.

 

The amendments also clarify that the guidance in Topic 275, Risks and Uncertainties, is applicable to entities that have not commenced planned principal operations.

 

Other recent accounting pronouncements issued by the FASB and the SEC did not or are not believed by management to have a material impact on the Company's present or future consolidated financial statements.